Meet Princess Saltwater and her Instagram novel

To be completely honest, I was unaware that Instagram novels were a thing. When I found out, I was intrigued, maybe because the first one I came across was Sophia Gatzionis’s “Princess Saltwater”. When you see her Instagram posts, you’ll know why.

I decided to approach her for a mini interview and here we are. Enjoy. Read more

A literary stroll in Saint-Germain-des-Prés [Photos + map]

Somehow, I had never been to Paris; despite living in London for the past five years and being just two hours away by train. I finally made it two weeks ago, but only for a weekend.

I spent my Saturday sight-seeing, just to cross the main spots off my list, and decided to treat my Sunday as a free day. I already knew what I wanted to do: walk around Saint-Germain-des-Prés. For those who don’t know, it is the neighbourhood where many major writers used to live. Read more

Fahrenheit 451 is not the temperature at which books burn; but still…

According to author Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451 is “the temperature at which book-paper catches fire, and burns”, but this is not quite right. “Several Internet contrarians claim that Bradbury confused Celsius and Fahrenheit, putting his estimate off by 391 Fahrenheit degrees. They cite as evidence the Handbook of Physical Testing of Paper, which lists paper’s ignition temperature as 450 degrees Celsius.” [1] Read more

10 useful things for those who did not attend the London Book Fair 2016 – part 2

Big as it may look, this was only one of the halls at London Book Fair 2016.

When the whole of an amazing industry is coming together under the roof of Olympia London, it can be nothing but a pure inspirational pleasure to be around these exciting and creative people.

If you were not lucky enough to be in London for the Fair to attend the seminars and the talks, here are 10 things you may find useful: Read more

10 useful things for those who did not attend the London Book Fair 2016 – part 1

The bag I am using when I go book shopping

When the whole of an amazing industry is coming together under the roof of Olympia London, it can be nothing but a pure inspirational pleasure to be around these exciting and creative people.

If you were not lucky enough to be in London for the Fair to attend the seminars and the talks, here are 10 things you may find useful:

 

1) Characters and research

Read more

Bukowski’s “Girl on an escalator” turned into a short film

Bukowski is probably one the most abused poets on the internet. His verses are taken out of context and are quoted by people who can barely understand his capability to decompose the world. You should read Bukowski only after you have dropped your judgemental ignorance and embraced the beauty of raw talent. Read more

Gabriel Garcia Marquez: “I realized I wanted to be a writer and that nobody could stop me and that the only thing left for me to do was to try to be the best writer in the world.”

I still remember the moment I finished reading One Hundred Years of Solitude. It was an easy summer afternoon and I was feeling blown away. I could not move. I could not do anything apart from looking at the wall mesmerized. It was the best thing I had ever read.

When he died, on 17th April 2014, I felt like I had lost my grand master. At least I was lucky enough to have been born while he was still alive.

This is an interview he gave to Peter H. Stone in the late 70s. From time to time, I like to read it to draw some inspiration. I’ve only included some of my favourite parts, but you can read it in whole on The Paris Review.

Before the interview begins, Stone sets the scene:

García Márquez was sitting at his desk at the far end of the studio. He came to greet me, walking briskly with a light step. He is a solidly built man, only about five feet eight or nine in height, who looks like a good middleweight fighter—broad-chested, but perhaps a bit thin in the legs. He was dressed casually in corduroy slacks with a light turtleneck sweater and black leather boots. His hair is dark and curly brown and he wears a full mustache.

INTERVIEWER

How did you start writing? Read more

How to prove your editor wrong

I have to admit that I didn’t know Shelby Foote. If his name doesn’t ring a bell to you either, then it may be worth to know that he was an American historian and novelist who wrote The Civil War: A Narrative, a critically-acclaimed, three-volume history of the American civil war.

Another fan fact about him is that he used to write only with old-fashioned dip pens as: Read more

“On Writing” by Stephen King: the holy book of any aspiring author

There is definitely a huge market out there profiting from aspiring authors: creative writing seminars, how-to-write-a-novel books, editing services, marketing tools, pitch writing services, self-publishing consultancies, review writing agencies, book fairs, writing conferences etc.

I have been attending the London Book Fair for the past three years, but other than that, I have not invested any money in anything else. I’ve been lucky enough to be traditionally published in Greece and disciplined enough to have self-published in English.

What made the difference for me in the last fifteen years was reading Stephen King’s “On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft”; and it only cost me $9 as I bought it for my Kindle app. Read more

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